Spring 2019 course descriptions

Course Registration - March 25 - April 4

 

30 Years Without a Paycheck: Navigating Your Way Through Retirement - A19201
Tuesday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Kelly Wilson, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twenty students.
Examine how to budget for retirement expenses, potential sources of retirement income, and potential risks such as LTC and health care costs.
*Kelly Wilson attended Auburn University and received her bachelor’s degree in accounting and her CFP® from Terry College of Business at UGA.

1969 – The Year Everything Changed - A19202
Wednesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Sunny Slope
Janet Deutsch, Instructor
Enrollment limited to eighteen students.
No class May 1
Text: Kirkpatrick, R. (2019). 1969 The Year Everything Changed. W. W. Norton.
ISBN: 978-1-61608-055-6.
From the Inaugural Address of Richard Nixon, January 20, 1969: “We have found ourselves rich in goods, but ragged in spirit; reaching with magnificent precision for the moon, but falling into raucous discord on earth. We are caught in war, wanting peace. We are torn by division, wanting unity. We see around us empty lives, wanting fulfillment. We see tasks that need doing, waiting for hands to do them. To a crisis of the spirit, we need an answer of the Spirit”
Thus began the last year of the tumultuous 60s. Following the terrible assassinations of MLK and RFK and the riots at the Chicago Democratic Convention and elsewhere, where was our good nation headed? In 1969 The Year Everything Changed by Rob Kirkpatrick, the incredible events of this year are presented as Seasons of Change that ended the decade in which “America tuned in, turned on, dropped out, grew up, woke up, blew up.” Was it a year when “everything changed” for you? Join us in lively discussion, using this book as a guide, accompanied by the great music and pictures of the year.
*Janet Deutsch and her family moved to Auburn in 1985. Retired now from hospital nursing, she still is a faith community nurse. Having grown up in the 60s, she loves to engage fellow “Boomers” and others around the things that made us what we are. Beyond that, how have our experiences and relationships perhaps enriched and changed us?

Akwaaba Ghana - A19203
Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Pebble Hill
Elizabeth Essamuah-Quansah, Instructor
This course is a general overview of the country Ghana in West Africa. The class will focus on the country’s history, religion, culture, environment, health, politics, and economics. It will especially delve into current opportunities for tourism and investment.
*Dr. Elizabeth I. Essamuah-Quansah is a Ghanaian-American who currently serves as the Director for AU Outreach Global. She earned her PhD in higher education administration from Auburn University, MBA in management from Indiana University, and BBA in human resources from Ghana. She has several years of work experiences in Ghana and other African countries, and in the U.S. industry, academia and NGOs, including serving as Coordinator for West Africa Global Ministries. 

The American Revolution, Part I - A19204
Wednesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
Sue Mason and John Parr, Instructors
Why did those 13 colonies, with nothing resembling a unified and trained army and with no navy to speak of, believe they could defeat the most powerful nation on the planet? And why was Britain, no matter how powerful, confident that it could prevail, even though burdened with a 3,000-mile supply line for troops and provisions, a “circuit of command” for time-critical orders that could consume three months or more, and the constant need to divert its forces, whether to protect against slave uprisings in the Caribbean or against the looming threat of the French on both sides of the Atlantic? Considerations like these are indicative of just how unlikely this conflict was, Professor Allen C. Guelzo notes in his gripping new Great Courses DVD, The American Revolution.
*Sue Mason holds degrees in education and geography. She has taught K-8 and DoD cartography, terrain analysis, GIS, and instructor training. She lived eight years in Europe and has traveled extensively.
*John Parr served in the U.S. Navy for 22 years. After retiring from the Navy, John became a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Evansville. Education: BS Electrical Engineering, Auburn University, 1969; MS Electrical Engineering, Naval Postgraduate School, 1974; PhD Electrical Engineering, Auburn University, 1988.

American Theater - A19205
Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Sunny Slope
Gibbs Couch and Peggy Stelpflug, Instructors
Enrollment limited to eighteen students.
Recital: Tuesday, May 14,
11:50 am – 12:30 pm; Auburn Church of Christ
Do you want to emote? Do you like attending the theatre? Here is your chance to become an actor or avid fan as we read plays produced in the American theatre from its early beginning to the present. No text is needed as scripts are provided for class readings.
*Gibbs Couch has always enjoyed a good story. Sometimes the stories are true. She enjoys telling stories, but likes hearing one even more. She has taught many storytelling and theatre classes.
*Peggy Stelpflug is an avid theatre-goer and script reader. She is a former English teacher and a member of the Auburn Community Theatre. She looks forward to advancing interest in American theatre.

Asian Politics and U.S. Policy - A19206
Monday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Lawrence Grinter, Instructor
With the Trump administration in office for over two years now, this course examines how East Asia and the Pacific have become even more important to the United States. Learn about Trump policies in Asia, China’s rise, Japan’s new confidence, North Korea and its nuclear weapons, South Korea’s global engagement, and other issues. Open discussion is encouraged.
*Lawrence E. Grinter is professor emeritus, Air War College, and a previous faculty member of the National War College, Auburn University, and AUM. His PhD is from UNC/Chapel Hill. He was stationed in South Korea and South Vietnam as a consultant to the US government.

The Atomic Bomb and the End of
World War II - A19207
Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
Frank Broz, Instructor
The first use of the atomic bomb has long been debated. Was it a way to end WWII quickly with minimal casualties or an unnecessary act of terror perpetrated by the U.S. and the Allies? In this class we will examine both the traditional view and the numerous revisionist theories that have emerged in the postwar world. It has been extensively revised since the initial presentation in the Spring of 2017 and offers a deeper look into Japanese prewar politics and their effect on the outcome. While primarily focused on the end of the WWII we will also examine the amazing technological advances of the early to mid-20th century. The class will also serve as a continuation of The War in the Pacific: A Military History with sessions on the Kamikaze, submarine warfare, and strategic bombing, topics which were not covered in detail during the Fall 2018 term. Suggested reading Downfall by Richard B. Frank.
*Frank Broz has a lifelong interest in military history with particular emphasis on the War in the Pacific. His career in sales training with major corporations has honed his presentation skills. Frank has a BA in history from Loyola University of Chicago.

Baseball: A Documentary Film Series by Ken Burns - A19208
Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Jim Barber, Instructor
Here is the story of America’s national pastime from master storyteller Ken Burns. It is an epic overflowing with heroes and hopefuls, scoundrels and screwballs. A saga spanning the quest for racial justice, the clash of labor and management, the immigrant experience, the transformation of popular culture, and the enduring appeal of the national pastime.
*Jim Barber is a recently retired construction engineer/contractor with four-score and a dozen years of experience that are cheerfully and thankfully in the past. He is working on his advanced degree in geezerhood and, specifically, serial napping and advanced grumpiness.

Birding Basics - A19209
Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Sunny Slope
Bill Deutsch, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twenty students.
This course is primarily for the beginning birder, and will be field-oriented. Inside class time will be used to talk about the natural history of birds, bird identification by sight and ear, identification aids, attracting birds around the home, and local birding locations. Most of our class time will be spent outdoors birding in the Auburn area at local parks and nature centers. Optional weekend field trips will be offered.
*Dr. Bill Deutsch is an aquatic ecologist who enjoys birding as a hobby. He has birded in Alabama, in other parts of the US, and in several countries with an emphasis on natural history of birds and bird photography.

The Birth of the West: The Later Middle Ages - A19210
Tuesday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
Joseph Kicklighter, Instructor
In this term we shall conclude our study of medieval Europe by considering various aspects of the late medieval world in the 14th and 15th centuries primarily. Most of us know of the Black Death, but we shall also consider the Christian Church‘s issues; monarchical instability in England, France, and the Empire; peasant unrest, and of course, The Hundred Years War. We have a lot to cover and I hope to see you there!
*Joseph Kicklighter earned a PhD in medieval Anglo-French history at Emory University and taught English history at Auburn University. He was an instructor in the Alabama at Oxford Program, where he had the opportunity to instruct students in England and to participate in tours of significant historical sites.

Death in Perspective - A19211
Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Jenny Filush-Glaze, Instructor
Text: Filush-Glaze, J. (2017). Grief Talks: Thoughts on Life, Death, and Positive Healing. Auburn, Alabama: Woodson Knowles Publishing Group. ISBN: 978-0-99806032-3.
Why this course? Have you ever wondered what to say or do to help support someone that is grieving? Do you have questions about end of life issues or what grief looks like across genders? How about spiritual or relationship issues? If so, this interactive class is just for you. Don’t let the word death keep you from learning more about living.
*Jenny Filush-Glaze is a licensed counselor who specializes in death, dying, and grief support. A published author and columnist, she encourages conversations on healing and education about the grief journey.

Developments in Climate Change and Renewable Energy in Alabama and Beyond - A19212
Monday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
David Newton, Instructor
An update on the status of climate change will be provided. New developments in increased use of alternative energy, i.e., non-fossil fuels, and the storage of electrical energy in Alabama and beyond will be discussed. Individuals in government, academia, and business who are associated with alternative energy production, research, and/or regulation will be invited to share their ideas and the results of their efforts. Suggestions concerning what citizens can do to help in reducing greenhouse gas emissions will be discussed. Participants in the course will be invited to share their experiences and ideas concerning conservation and use of energy.
*David Newton has offered sixteen OLLI environmental courses over the years. He is a member of several national environmental organizations, has been a lobbyist for the environment, has traveled to all seven continents, has monitored the water quality of Saugahatchee Creek, has studied climate change for at least ten years, and has worked daily to help protect the Earth - our, and our descendants’, only home.

Do-It-Yourself Engineering - A19213
Tuesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
Ned Dendy, Herb Shivers, and John Parr Instructors
This is a Great Courses presentation by Professor Stephen Ressler, United States Military Academy, West Point. The professor discusses and demonstrates how to design, build and test seventeen projects including a suspension bridge, a rubber-powered helicopter, a water turbine, and a wooden pendulum clock. The Spring term will include twelve lessons, two each week, as follows:
Week 1. Why DIY Engineering? and Exploring            
the science of structure
Week 2. Design and build a cardboard tower and
Bridging with beams
Week 3. Make a suspension bridge and Design
a concrete sailboat
Week 4. Set sail! and Make a radio-controlled
blimp
Week 5. Exploring aerodynamics and Build a
model airplane
Week 6. Take flight! and Build a model helicopter
*Ned Dendy graduated from Auburn University in aerospace engineering. He worked with NASA, with commercial aviation manufacturing, and with the United States Army Missile Defense Systems.
*Dr. Charles H. “Herb” Shivers, PhD, PE, CSP, although retired, is Professor and Associate Graduate Program Director of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Master of Engineering track in Advanced Safety Engineering and Management and is also a member of the UAB Graduate Faculty. 
*John Parr served in the U.S. Navy for 22 years. After retiring from the Navy, John became a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Evansville. Education: BS Electrical Engineering, Auburn University, 1969; MS Electrical Engineering, Naval Postgraduate School, 1974; PhD Electrical Engineering, Auburn University, 1988.

An Eighth Opera Season - A19214
Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
Thomas Beard, Instructor
April 9, 16, 23 (three class sessions)
Using DVDs and lectures, we will look at three operas. They are Lehar’s The Merry Widow, Giordano’s Andrea Chenier, and Donizetti’s Don Pasquale.
*Thomas Beard is a retired economics professor at Louisiana State University. This is his eighth year to teach opera courses for OLLI at Auburn.

Ekphrastic Poetry - A19215
Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Jule Collins Smith Museum Galleries
Wendy Cleveland and Scott Bishop, Instructors
Enrollment limited to ten students.
Ekphrastic poetry is the poetic description of, or commentary on, a visual work of art. Working directly with works of art in Jule Collins Smith Museum’s permanent collection, participants will discuss and write about paintings, photographs, quilts, and Audubon prints. The poetic response might be a description of the art, a narrative of what the observer sees, or a reflection of why/how the subject engages the writer. Each week participants will share their poems. *Wendy Cleveland taught high school English for thirty years in upstate New York. Her poems have appeared in magazines and journals, and she is the author of the poetry collection Blue Ford.
*Scott Bishop is Curator of Academic and Public Programs at Jule Collins Smith Museum. She studied philosophy and literature at Auburn University, and art history at Emory University.

Exploring Melville’s Moby Dick - A19216
Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Pebble Hill
Margaret Kouidis, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twenty students.
Text: Melville, H. (2003). Moby Dick. Dover. ISBN: 978-048643215720.
Read chapters 1-5 of Moby Dick for the first class.
Moby Dick (1851) may be one of the most admired yet unread American novels. Exercising more caution than Captain Ahab, we will not confront the whole whale. Rather, each class discussion will focus on 20-25 pages that represent key aspects of Melville’s storytelling, as well as his moral, cultural, and political analysis of his time, and to a significant degree, our own.
*Margaret Kouidis taught American literature in the Auburn English Department for 35 years before retiring in 2009.

Great Decisions 2019 - A19217
Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
John Frandsen, Instructor
Text: The Foreign Policy Association. Great Decisions, 2019. (copies are available for $20, cash only, at the first class session)
Great Decisions is the Foreign Policy Association’s civic-education program in which participants learn about U.S. foreign policy and global issues. Topics for 2019 include global migration, the Middle East, nuclear negotiations, nationalism in Europe, trade with China, cyber conflict, U.S. and Mexico relations, and the state of diplomacy. Each class session starts with a DVD lesson followed by a discussion. A Briefing book (available at the first class session for $20, cash only) provides background, policy options, maps, websites, and blogs.
*John Frandsen is a biological scientist, professor, and retired Army officer with an interest in international affairs dating from his attendance at a National Defense university seminar in the late 1970s.

Great Modern Poets: William Butler Yeats - A19218
Tuesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Pebble Hill
Steve Harrison, Instructor
Text: Yeats, W.B.; ed. Jeffares, A.N. (1989). Yeats’s Poems 1989 Edition. Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN: 978-0333510612.
Irish poet W. B. Yeats is widely regarded as the greatest English-language poet of the twentieth century. In this class we’ll survey his work, including the early ultra-Romantic lyrics, the mystical and philosophical poems of his late middle age, and the sensual lyrics of his late career. Each class will include information on Yeats’s life and on the philosophical ideas on which he relied, careful readings of individual poems, and open discussion.
*Steve Harrison is a lifelong poetry enthusiast. He received an M.A. in English literature from Auburn, worked in the software industry until retirement, and then taught literature at Southern Union Community College.

How to Listen to and Understand Great Music, Part III - A19219
Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Jane Brown, Instructor
We begin this continuation of Professor Robert Greenberg’s music history course with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, written at the beginning of the 19th century. This century saw the Romantic era in music and in its latter half, a folkloric approach to musical nationalism. We conclude with an introduction to early 20th century modernism. Along the way we will hear music by such composers as Franz Schubert, Frederic Chopin, Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Franz Liszt, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, Claude Debussy, Igor Stravinsky and Arnold Schonberg.
*Jane Brown retired from teaching in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Auburn University. She currently plays violin with the Auburn Community Orchestra. She also plays piano and recorder.

An Inside Look at the U.S. Intelligence Community and Special Operations - A19220
Monday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
Pebble Hill
Frenchy Fortin, Instructor
This course provides an inside view of the U.S. Intelligence Community, with a focus on the Big Five (CIA, NSA, NGA, DIA, and NRO) as well as the FBI.  The NSA session will include a discussion of cyber warfare. The course will also provide an overview of Special Operations organizations and technologies. 
*In 2013, Claude “Frenchy” Fortin and his wife, Kay, retired to the Auburn/Opelika area to join their two daughters and grandchildren. Frenchy served twenty years in the U.S. Air Force as a computer and systems engineer, including installations at Bitburg Air Base Germany, Space Command/NORAD in Colorado, and Maxwell AFB in Montgomery.  He also taught French for four years at the U.S. Air Force Academy.  After retirement from the Air Force, he became a defense contractor focusing on providing intelligence support to the military, with the last twenty years at Special Operations Command in Tampa, Florida.

Intermediate Spanish - A19221
Tuesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Sunny Slope
Judy Dekich, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
Text: de Saint-Exupery, A. (2001). El Principito. Mariner Books. ISBN 9780156013925.
Join us Spring Term for the conclusion of the mystery-drama, The Diary of Ernesto Madero.  This slowed-down audiobook has an interactive transcript and is suitable for intermediate students.  Our grammar lessons will consider the subjunctive mood’s more subtle points. We will concentrate on the past subjunctive but also review the present. We will continue reading El Principito, by Antoine de St. Exupery.
*Judy Dekich majored in Spanish at Emory University. After getting a second degree in pharmacy and practicing as a registered pharmacist, Judy is teaching Spanish to help others learn this beautiful language.

Learning Spanish I: How to Understand and Speak a New Language, Part II (Beginner) - A19222
Monday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Sylvia Cooke, Instructor
Book: Learning Spanish workbook available during the first class session for $13, cash only. This workbook will be used for four consecutive terms.
Spring 2019 term class is part 2 of 4. This Great Courses class features Bill Worden, PhD. He has over twenty years’ experience as an award-winning professor of Spanish. Spoken by over 500 million people worldwide, Spanish is the official language of over twenty countries. This introductory course blends exercises to teach pronunciation, vocabulary building, and basic grammar to empower students to gain confidence with every lesson.
*Sylvia Cooke is retired after 32 years as a Spanish teacher, twenty of which were at Auburn High School. She taught all levels of Spanish from beginning speakers through preparation for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate examinations.

Learning Spanish II: How to Understand and Speak a New Language, Part II (Advanced Beginner) - A19223
Wednesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Sunny Slope
Sylvia Cooke, Instructor
Enrollment limited to eighteen students.
Book: Learning Spanish workbook available during the first class session for $13, cash only. This workbook will be used for four consecutive terms.
This class is slightly more advanced than the other Learning Spanish class. Spring 2019 term is part 2 of 4. This Great Courses DVD follows on the first Spanish course, taking you to the next level of mastery of this beautiful and incredibly useful language. This exciting program grounds you in the fundamentals that will help you work toward fluency, enhancing your ability to converse with your Spanish-speaking friends and acquaintances, to speak Spanish more skillfully as a traveler—to enjoy the thrill and pleasure of communication in a language spoken by half a billion people around the world.
*Sylvia Cooke is retired after 32 years as a Spanish teacher, twenty of which were at Auburn High School. She taught all levels of Spanish from beginning speakers through preparation for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate examinations.

Library Savvy and Info Smart: Exploring Auburn University Libraries – A19224
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 4:30 – 6:00 pm
Ralph Brown Draughon Library: Newspaper Reading Room and Gibbs Information Literacy Lab
Jaena Alabi, Barbara Bishop, Delaney Bullinger, and Adelia Grabowsky, Instructors
May 14, 15, and 16 (three class sessions)
Parking available in the Library parking deck. No parking pass required.
You should obtain your AU Community ID card and have it activated at the RBD Library prior to the start of the course.
Find out how to make the most of your access to Auburn University Libraries’ extensive research collections with this three-day course.  A team of expert librarians will guide you through the process of finding books, magazine and newspaper articles, quality health information, and more! 
*Jaena Alabi is an English and psychology librarian.
*Barbara Bishop is a communication and journalism librarian.
*Delaney Bullinger is an instruction librarian.
*Adelia Grabowsky is a health sciences librarian.

Line Dancing – Beginner - A19225
Monday, 10:15 – 11:00 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Betsy Keown and Wanda Knight, Instructors
Enrollment limited to thirty students.
This 45-minute class will introduce students to line dancing. Basic steps and dances will be taught. We will dance to a variety of music - everything from Glenn Miller to Willie Nelson, Charlie Daniels, Little Big Town, and many more. Not only is it fun, but great exercise for the body and the mind. Wear comfortable shoes, preferably not rubber-soled, and bring a water bottle.
*Betsy Keown has been line dancing twice weekly for more than ten years and teaching for the past five. She loves the exercise and the joy of performing at nursing homes and other venues.
*Wanda Knight has been line dancing a little over eight years and has assisted Betsy Keown for several classes. 

Line Dancing – Intermediate - A19226
Monday, 11:10 – 11:55 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Betsy Keown and Wanda Knight, Instructors
Enrollment limited to thirty students.
This 45-minute intermediate class will review basic steps and teach new steps while dancing to a variety of music - everything from Glenn Miller to Willie Nelson, Charlie Daniels, Little Big Town, and many more. Not only is it fun, but great exercise for the body and the mind. Wear comfortable shoes, preferably not rubber-soled, and bring a water bottle.
*Betsy Keown has been line dancing twice weekly for more than ten years and teaching for the past five. She loves the exercise and the joy of performing at nursing homes and other venues.
*Wanda Knight has been line dancing a little over eight years and has assisted Betsy Keown for several classes. 

A Little Art / A Little Lunch
Friday, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm
Jule Collins Smith Museum Galleries
Scott Bishop, Instructor
Enrollment limited to ten students.
Join Jule Collins Smith Museum volunteer docents for focused talks on objects in the museum’s permanent collection, then join the docent and the class for lunch and discussion in the museum’s café. You can bring your own lunch or order in the café/ A table will be reserved for the class. Register for each individual class by using the day’s course number.
April 5 - A19227           
Lynn Katz will lead a talk on
PRINTS OF TWO EGRETS, POST AUDUBON: Victoria Hutson Huntley’s Detail
   Cuthbert Rookery
and Warrington Colescott’s Audubon in the Atchafalaya.
April 12 - A19227A
Charlotte LaRoux will lead a talk about the artist Sandy Skoglund.
April 19 - A19227B         
Ginny Wolfe will lead a talk about the artist Romare Bearden
April 26 - A19227C         
Debbie Flick will lead a talk about the quilts on the JCSM collection.
May 3 - A19227D           
Bill Squires will lead a talk about the artist Howard Finster.   
May 17 - A19227E          
Margaret Craig-Schmidt will lead a talk about the GENESIS work of artist
Sebastiao Salgado: The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Alaska. USA 2009.
*Scott Bishop is curator of education at Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University.

The Middle History of the Christian Church: From the Time of Mohammed to Martin Luther (610-1516) - A19228
Wednesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
Ben Jefferies, Instructor
During the Spring 2019 term we will cover new centers of gravity and new threats; the Carolingian Renaissance and the re-establishment of the Christian Church; the rise of monastic institutions and their influence and reformations; corruptions within and struggles with the Papacy: Kings and Councils; the emergence of medieval Christendom: Cathedrals, Crusades and Catholic Learning; and early reform movements and the reformation ground-laying of the Early Renaissance.
*Reverend Ben Jefferies received an MDiv in 2014, with a heavy emphasis on historical theology. He serves now as an Anglican priest in Opelika. Growing up in the Baptist Church was an introduction to church history that led him to embrace the riches of tradition in his present vocation.

The Moral Challenges of Genetic Advances - A19229
Tuesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Gerald Elfstrom, Instructor
This course will give folks background on the science of genetic manipulation and the moral issues related to these advances. We will also provide sufficient background to understand what these techniques can and cannot do.
*Gerard Elfstrom is professor of philosophy at Auburn University. He earned his BA from Cornell College and an MA and PhD from Emory University, all in philosophy. Though he has taught a variety of philosophy courses, for the past several years, he has primarily offered an introduction to logic. He has done research in applied ethics, the ethics of international relations, and the philosophy of science.  

The New Deal and Its Legacy - A19230
Monday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Pebble Hill
Larry Gerber, Instructor
This course will focus on the New Deal programs FDR enacted in the 1930s.  We will examine the origins and ongoing legacy of Social Security, banking regulation, public works programs, labor legislation, and other New Deal initiatives that reshaped the role of government in the United States.  We will also consider the factors that made it possible for FDR to be so successful in getting an unprecedented amount of path-breaking legislation through Congress.
*Larry Gerber received his PhD from the University of California and taught modern U.S. history at Auburn University.

Oceanography: Exploring Earth’s Final Wilderness, Part I - A19231
Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Don Baker, Instructor
Earth’s ocean is a source of wonder, delight, sustenance, economic benefit, and awe in the face of its overwhelming mystery and power. It dominates the natural world in ways that scientists are only now beginning to understand. And although we call our home planet Earth, it would be more accurate to name it Ocean, since 71% of the globe is covered with water, and beneath the waves churn forces that make our world unique in the solar system:

  • Along mid-ocean ridges, lava flows from Earth’s interior, forming new oceanic crust and driving the formation and movement of continents via the crucial process of plate tectonics.
  • The ocean’s tremendous mass and thermal inertia serve as a climate control thermostat, moderating temperatures and making the planet habitable.
  • Life began in the ocean and was exclusively marine for billions of years; we owe our oxygen-rich atmosphere to the photosynthetic activity of oceanic organisms.

But for all its importance, the ocean hides its secrets, and it is only with the advent of new sounding and sampling techniques, satellite sensors, and deep sea submersibles that its riddles are being solved, shedding light on a domain that is breathtaking in its complexity and beauty.
*Don Baker has a PhD in physical chemistry and a JD. He has over 35 years’ experience as an environmental attorney. During this time he developed a strong interest in the interaction of the academic, industrial, and governmental influences on our lives.

Origins of Life - A192312
Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Charlotte Ward, Instructor
Four billion years ago, the infant Earth was a seething cauldron of erupting volcanoes, raining meteors, and hot noxious gases, totally devoid of life. But a relatively short time later—100 to 200 million years—the planet was teeming with primitive organisms. What happened?
Professor Robert M. Hazen, one of the nation’s foremost science educators and leader of a NASA-supported team that is studying the origins of life in the universe, leads you on a 24-lecture expedition to find the answer to this momentous question. The search takes you from path-breaking experiments in the 19th century proving that the molecules of life are no different from other chemicals, to the increasingly sophisticated understanding in the 20th century of how the chemistry of life works, to the near certainty that the 21st century will see spectacular and unpredictable developments in our understanding of how life began.
*Charlotte Ward, associate professor emerita, physics, has sought for many years to make science accessible to interested people with little background in science.

Painting SIG – Open Studio - A19233
Thursday, 9:00 – 11:00 am
Sunny Slope
No Instructor
Enrollment limited to ten students.
This time and space is reserved for intermediate to advanced painters who would like to get together and paint. No instructor will be present. Vinyl tablecloths are provided to protect the tables. Please take the provided tablecloths off and place in basket at the end of each open studio session. Participants are responsible for setting up and cleaning up their own materials. Registration is required so we know how many people to prepare for.

Researching Your Family History I - A19234
Wednesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Sunny Slope
Shawnee McKee, Instructor
Enrollment limited to eighteen students.
Do you wonder where your family came from? This course will give you the basic tools to start your research. You will learn about the various methods, resources, and tools to begin discovering your family history.
*Shawnee McKee is our newest OLLI employee. She’s been researching history and genealogy for the past two years and aspires to continue her education in professional writing and history.

Seated Tai Chi for Arthritis - A19235
Monday, 12:45 – 1:25 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Kitty Frey and Sandy Wu, Instructors
Enrollment limited to fourteen students.
Seated Tai Chi, adapted from Dr. Paul Lam’s Tai Chi for Arthritis, was designed to enhance flexibility, muscle tone, and fitness. It incorporates the essential principles of Tai Chi with an emphasis on breathing, posture, and space awareness, with the added benefit of stress reduction. Other exercises found to be beneficial for those with arthritis will be included.
*Kitty Frey is an occupational therapist and teacher. An experienced teacher of Taiji and Qigong for many years, she understands that these gentle yet powerful practices offer never-ending learning and show that healing is possible.

Sign Language for All - A19236
Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
Sunny Slope
Betty Hare, Instructor
Class begins April 16.
Enrollment limited to eighteen students.
Come join us now! No prerequisite or prior sign-language experience necessary. Learning sign language is a wonderful exercise for your brain and hands. We will learn the alphabet, numbers, and basic signs for animals and foods. The class will practice in small groups. We will also spend some time learning about all the different types of sign language and review what was covered during the fall term.
*Ever since Betty Hare served OLLI as the first AV assistant, she has wanted to teach for OLLI. She will be offering a sign language class based on her experience teaching special education.

Songwriters Workshop - A19237
Wednesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Sunny Slope
Ted McVay, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
The goal of this class is to explore together the ancient art of writing songs. Previous experience and instrumental prowess are not needed; having sung along or just listened to songs is a sufficient prerequisite. We will talk about what songs are, analyze some favorite songs, talk about song structure, lyrics, melody, and songwriting. We will have a weekly song circle with the option to present our efforts (individual or collaborative) for purposes of feedback.
*Ted McVay is a retired Spanish professor who has been writing songs for six years. His album, Voices in My Head was released in 2017.

Spring Mysteries - A19238
Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Sunny Slope
Julie Strong, Instructor
Enrollment limited to sixteen students.
Texts: Owens, D. (2018). Where the Crawdads Sing. G.P. Putnam’s Sons. ISBN 978 0735219090.
Todd, C. (2011). A Test of Wills: The First Inspector Ian Rutledge Mystery. William Morrow Paperbacks. ISBN 978 0062091611.
Penny, L. (2013). The Beautiful Mystery: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel. Minotaur Books. ISBN 978 1250031129.
Welcome to curling up with a good mystery on a cool and breezy spring night. Choosing and directing discussions of the books listed above in order are Julie Strong, Janet Clark, and Camille Carr. The books will be discussed in the order in which they appear above.
*Julie Strong has a BA in English and comparative literature from Columbia University. She holds a MEd degree in early childhood education and a master’s degree in gifted and talented education. A retired teacher, she facilitates book clubs.

Staying Active: Day Hiking - A19239
Thursday, 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Sunny Slope
Harold Bruner, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twelve students.
$20 fee, payable on the first day of class, to reimburse volunteer drivers for their expenses.
Registration for this course will be done by lottery. Register between March 25 and April 4 to be included in the drawing. The final class roster will be sent to everyone who registered during the open time period.
This course continues with our goal of experiencing day-hiking opportunities within fifty miles or so of Auburn. This is a more advanced class with hikes of 4-7 miles and somewhat challenging terrain. You should be moderately fit, have experience in hiking these distances, and a willingness to maintain a moderate pace with the group.  A small day pack and hiking poles are suggested.
*Harold Bruner is a retired forester who now hikes for fitness and pleasure. He has hiked extensively in much of the U.S. and more recently in seven of the ten Canadian Provinces. Having spent more than sixty years in Indiana and Florida, he now enjoys the biodiverse landscape of Alabama.

Stretch and Balance - A19240
Monday, 2:30 – 3:30 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Tammy Hollis, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twenty-five students.
Stretch and Balance will move through a series of seated and standing yoga poses using a chair for support. These postures are designed to increase flexibility, balance, and range of movement. This class is suitable for nearly every fitness level.
*Tammy Hollis is certified by the American Council on Exercise Group Fitness. She also has certifications for YogaFit and Silver Sneakers. Currently, Tammy serves as an instructor for Yin Yoga for the City of Auburn for its 50+ program, for Yin Yoga for Opelika Sportsplex, for Silver Sneakers Circuit and Classic Classes, and for Silver Sneakers and Gentle Yoga for Opelika Sportsplex.

Taiji Qigong: Moving Meditation - A19241
Monday, 1:30 – 2:10 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Kitty Frey and Sandy Wu, Instructors
Enrollment limited to twenty students.
Taiji Qigong was designed as a deeply relaxing body-mind experience. Composed of several sets, each serves unique purposes that are easy to learn and, with regular practice, can replenish energy, improve health, and help prevent illness. Several variations of Taiji walking will also be introduced. Participants must be able to be up and moving for 45 minutes.
*Kitty Frey is an occupational therapist and teacher. An experienced teacher of Taiji and Qigong for many years, she understands that these gentle yet powerful practices offer never-ending learning and show that healing is possible.

Walk This Way: Couch to Walking 5K - A19242
Thursday, 8:30 – 9:30 am
Toomer’s Corner Oaks
Bob Banks, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twenty students.
Join us for this six-week program designed to assist you in developing a walking exercise program. Students will meet at Toomer’s Corner by the oaks each Thursday to learn about the benefits of walking. This course is open to novice and veteran walkers.
*Bob Banks is an avid runner. Bob is a retired ALFA insurance professional.

Writing Our Lives - A19243
Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
Pebble Hill
Terry Ley and Cathy Buckhalt, Instructors
Enrollment limited to fifty students.
Text: Roorbach, B. (2008). Writing Life Stories: How to Make Memories into Memoirs, Ideas into Essays and Life into Literature. Cincinnati, OH: Writers Digest. ISBN: 978-1-58297-527-6.
“Our Lives are like a patchwork quilt, and it is only in the evening of life that we can see the pattern of what we have woven.” (Richard L. Morgan, Saving Our Stories: A Legacy We Leave) We all have life stories to tell! Here is an opportunity to reclaim your memories, write about them, and share them with a receptive audience of peers. We will write each Monday morning, responding to stimulus prompts provided by the instructor. Recommended homework: finishing and revising what you have begun in class and reading self-selected memoirs, biographies, and autobiographies.
*Terry Ley taught high school English in Iowa before coming to Auburn University, where he was a professor of English education. He has taught Writing Our Lives each OLLI term for fourteen years.
*Cathy Buckhalt is a retired teacher from Opelika Middle School and Southern Union State Community College. She also was associate director of the Sun Belt Writing Project for many years.

Yoga for the Rest of Us - A19244
Monday, 9:00 – 9:55 am
Auburn Church of Christ
Tammy Hollis, Instructor
Enrollment limited to twenty-five students.
This course is for anyone who has practiced yoga. All levels are welcome. The focus is on stretching, movement, and balance, all interwoven with breathing techniques. Bring your mat and towel to support your knees or back, and wear comfortable clothing as we continue our yoga journey together. Bring a water bottle.
*Tammy Hollis is certified by the American Council on Exercise Group Fitness. She also has certifications for YogaFit and Silver Sneakers. Currently, Tammy serves as an instructor for Yin Yoga for the City of Auburn for its 50+ program, for Yin Yoga for Opelika Sportsplex, for Silver Sneakers Circuit and Classic Classes, and for Silver Sneakers and Gentle Yoga for Opelika Sportsplex.

Culinary Creations: Cooking with Ursula Higgins
Wednesday and Thursday, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
503 Sanders St. Auburn
Ursula Higgins, Instructor
$15 fee per class, non-refundable, payable to Ursula
Enrollment limited to seven students in each Wednesday class and seven students in each Thursday class.
Respected culinary expert Ursula Higgins presents a series of cooking classes. Each week
features two hands-on classes with the same menu. Students will eat their culinary creations. If you have dietary restrictions, please contact Ursula. If a student registers for a culinary course and then is unable to attend, he or she is responsible for finding an OLLI academic member to fill the opening.
Register for each individual class by using the day’s course number.

Entrée Pastas
April 10 - A19245
April 11 - A19246

Spring Seafood
April 24 - A19247
April 25 - A19248

Different Chicken Salads
May 1 - A19249
May 2 - A19250

It’s Vegetable Season Again
May 15 - A19251
May 16 - A19252



    


         

Last Updated: March 19, 2019