FALL 2018 Course Listing

21st Century Issues – A18401
            Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
            Auburn Church of Christ
            John Frandsen, Instructor
This course will be a presentation and discussion of subjects of general concern to society such as: evidence based medicine, impacts of the warming climate, drug addiction, restriction of research and development, future epidemics, integrity of science, future of democracy, and  future wars.
*John Frandsen is a retired research biologist, professor, and Army officer who has taught past OLLI courses on infectious diseases, “Great Decisions” (a series sponsored by the Foreign Policy Association), and “Great Issues” (a course similar to this). His interest in public policy was born many years ago in a seminar sponsored by the National Defense University.

The Amazing Planet Earth – A18402
            Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
            Sonny Dawsey, Instructor
The Earth’s surface includes a wide variety of features. The mountains, deserts, lowlands, rivers and oceans create landscapes that are both interesting and beautiful. This course will examine these features and the processes that produced them. We will also look at the interaction between people and the physical environment. The class will be richly illustrated with images, maps and videos.
*Sonny Dawsey is a retired professor of geography, Auburn University. He has taught many classes for OLLI.

The American West: History, Myth, and Legacy – A18403
            Wednesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
            Sue Mason and John Parr, Instructors
It has been several years since OLLI has studied the American West. This Great Courses DVD course shows the brutal conflict of cowboys and Indians. Dr. Patrick N. Allitt of Emory University gives a new perspective on the dusty, dangerous outposts policed by vigilante justice, the six-shooter showdown at high noon, the daring railroad heists and arduous cattle drives. These and other scenes from countless Western films have so shaped our conception of the American West that it’s impossible to separate myth from reality. But how wild was the West? Was it really ever “won”? The DVD lectures will be supplemented by lessons further delving into topics of interest.
*Sue Mason holds degrees in education and geography. She has taught K-8 and DoD cartography, terrain analysis, GIS, and instructor training. She lived eight years in Europe and has traveled extensively.
*John Parr served in the U.S. Navy for 22 years. After retiring from the Navy, John became a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Evansville. Education: BS Electrical Engineering, Auburn University, 1969; MS Electrical Engineering, Naval Postgraduate School, 1974; PhD Electrical Engineering, Auburn University, 1988.

Asian Politics and US Policy – A18404
            Monday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Lawrence Grinter, Instructor
With the Trump administration now twenty-one months in office, this course examines how East Asia and the Pacific have become even more important to the United States. Learn about Trump policies in Asia, China’s rise, Japan’s new confidence, North Korea and its nuclear weapons, South Korea’s global engagement, and other issues. Open discussion is encouraged.
*Lawrence E. Grinter is professor emeritus, Air War College, and a previous faculty member of the National War College, Auburn University, and AUM. His PhD is from UNC/Chapel Hill. He was stationed in South Korea and South Vietnam with or consulting to the US government.

AU Common Book: One Amazing Thing by Chitra Divakaruni – A18405
            Wednesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Sunny Slope
            Janet Deutsch, Instructor
September 26, October 17, 24, 31, November 7, 14 (six class sessions)
Enrollment limited to SIXTEEN students.
Auburn University has selected One Amazing Thing by Chitra Divakaruni as the institution’s 2018-19 Common Book. OLLI at Auburn is looking forward to being a part of this community-wide focus during our Fall 2018 term.
One Amazing Thing tells the story of a group of nine people from different cultures and backgrounds who, after becoming become trapped together by an earthquake in an embassy in an unidentified city in the US use stories about “one amazing thing” from their lives to help them survive. Although it is “fiction”, much truth is found within its pages.
The book’s primary themes address cultural and ethnic diversity using storytelling while engaging readers in discussions about karma, stereotyping, cultural misunderstandings, and the value of courageous conversations. Additional topics include personal disaster preparedness, government preparation for and response to life-threatening events, and the difficulties of leadership in crisis. I am looking forward to sharing in lively discussions of these themes and other topics that pop up among the wonderful folk that are OLLI at Auburn.
Members of the campus community are encouraged to read the book and attend a keynote by the author on September 19th, 2018. Time and place to be announced.
*Janet Deutsch has lived in Auburn for 32 years. She is a retired nurse with a love for listening to and learning from others while exploring key events in each of our lives.

Becoming a Better Grandparent: Grandchildren from Infancy to Age 10 – A18406
            Thursday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Clarion Inn & Suites
            Paris Strom and Robert Strom, Instructors
The capabilities of young children are examined with ways for grandparents to support them. Topics include introducing preschoolers to the Internet, recognizing the importance of play, acquiring empathy and social skills, encouraging self-regulation and patience, teaching conflict resolution, influencing growth in vocabulary, questions to ask while watching television together, and the impact of solitude on reflective thinking.
*A son and father team, Paris is professor of educational psychology at Auburn teaching child, adolescent, and adult development; Bob is a retired professor of educational psychology from Arizona State where he taught courses in lifespan developmental psychology.

Beginner Line Dancing – A18407
            Monday, 10:15 – 11:00 am
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Betsy Keown and Wanda Knight, Instructors
Register for EITHER the beginner class OR the intermediate class.
Enrollment limited to THIRTY students.

This 45-minute class will introduce students to line dancing. Basic steps and dances will be taught. We will dance to a variety of music - everything from Glenn Miller to Willie Nelson, Charlie Daniels, Little Big Town and many more. Not only is it fun, but great exercise for the body and the mind. Wear comfortable shoes, preferably not rubber-soled, and bring a water bottle.
*Betsy Keown has been line dancing twice weekly for nine years and teaching for the past four. She loves the exercise and the joy of performing at nursing homes and other venues.
*Wanda Knight has been line dancing a little over eight years and has assisted Betsy Keown for several classes.  

Beginning Acrylic Painting – A18408
            Thursday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Clarion Inn and Suites
            Rebecca Long, Instructor
Register for EITHER the beginner class OR the intermediate class.
Enrollment limited to THIRTY students.
Small set of acrylic paint or one tube each of White, red, Ultramarine blue, Sap or Hookers green, yellow and black. One set of brushes for acrylics. 3-4 11 x 14 canvas panels.
Painting in acrylics can be fun and relaxing and is easier than you think! This course will introduce you to acrylic paints, brushes, techniques and drawing so that you can complete 3-4 small paintings during the term. This class is for the true beginner.
*Rebecca recently retired from Auburn University and is a professional photographer.

Beginning Sign Language – A18409
            Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
            Sunny Slope
            Betty Hare, Instructor
Enrollment limited to EIGHTEEN students.
Learning Sign Language is a wonderful exercise for your brain and hands. We will learn the alphabet, numbers, and basic signs like animals and foods. The class will practice in small groups. We will also spend some time learning about all the different types of sign language, even baby sign.
*Ever since Betty served OLLI as the first AV assistant, she has wanted to teach. She will be offering a sign language class based on her experience teaching special education.

Beginning Spanish – A18410
            Monday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
            Sunny Slope
            Marina Hornus, Instructor
Enrollment limited to EIGHTEEN students.
Join us to learn in a funny way to greet people, introduce yourself, numbers, body parts, alphabet, things in classroom, weather conditions, and seasons in Spanish. Marima enjoys teaching Spanish and sharing her culture.
*Marina Hornus is from Argentina. She has a degree in chemical engineering and has taught in high school. She is currently working toward her Master’s degree in Forestry and Wildlife Sciences at Auburn University.

Birding Basics – A18411
            Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Sunny Slope
            Bill Deutsch, Instructor
September 24, October 22, 29, November 12 (four class sessions)
Enrollment limited to FIFTEEN students.
Students are encouraged to bring binoculars to class with optional cameras and spotting scopes.
This course is primarily for the beginning birder, and will be field-oriented. Classroom time will be used to talk about the natural history of birds, bird identification by sight and ear, identification aids, attracting birds around the home, and local birding locations. Most class time will be spent birding in the Auburn area at local parks and nature centers. Optional weekend field trips will be offered.
*Dr. Bill Deutsch is an aquatic ecologist who enjoys birding as a hobby. He has birded in Alabama, in other parts of the US, and in several countries with an emphasis on natural history of birds and bird photography.

The Birth of the West: The Early Middle Ages – A18412
            Tuesday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
            Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
            Joseph Kicklighter, Instructor
Many of us associate words like “medieval” with backward and ignorant. Those who study the period known as Middle Ages beg to differ. This course is going to be an effort to explore what the term means, how it came to be, and that of course it means to those who live in what is commonly known as the West. To do this, we must go back to Roman Empire in its later centuries and consider its Western part and its associations with the Christian Church as well as the Germanic peoples who come to reside there. These three elements, which gradually merge together, Roman, German and Christian are regarded as the essential ones of the Western world. Our first term study will take us through the first ruler, Charlemagne who is considered the first Western Christian Roman Emperor. Crowned Roman Emperor by the Pope in CE 800, Charles was King of the Germanic people known as Franks. Here we end our fall classes, as at least theoretically the West now had evolved during the past few centuries its own distinct civilization. What will become of it in subsequent times will be the subject of the winter and spring sessions.
*Joseph Kicklighter earned a PhD in medieval Anglo-French history at Emory University and taught English history at Auburn University. He was an instructor in the Alabama at Oxford Program, where he had the opportunity to instruct students in England and to participate in tours of significant historical sites.

Chinese Brush Painting – A18413
            Monday, 12:00 – 1:55 pm
            Sunny Slope
            Dong Shang, Instructor
September 24, October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 (six class sessions)
$70 fee, payable to Dong, for the purchase of a Chinese painting kit that includes rice paper, three brushes, ink, and Chinese water colors.
Enrollment limited to TWELVE students.
This hands-on course is an introduction to Chinese brush painting and calligraphy. Chinese painting attempts to capture the essence of nature. It is the art of using suggestion and simplicity to imply reality. The sense of harmony that pervades Chinese culture is expressed in the traditional subjects of flowers, animals, and landscapes. Learn the basic brush strokes, composition, and spontaneous-style painting techniques.
*Dong Shang is a native of China and has a degree in art. An art designer, she immigrated to the United States, where she has worked as a freelance artist and an art teacher.

Chinese Culture and Travel: Silk Road Adventures – A18414
            Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Sunny Slope
            Douglas Coutts and Dong Shang, Instructors
September 24, October 1, 8 (three class sessions)
Enrollment limited to TWENTY-FIVE students.
The Silk Road was the global internet of its day. For the first part of the course (weeks one and two) Prof. Coutts will present and discuss various historical aspects of the Silk Road including the emergence of Buddhism, the spread of Christianity, the first use of currency, links with the West, and the role of Marco Polo.  From Dong Shang, learn about Chinese culture, including history, geography, ethnic minorities, religions, festivals, arts, food, and practical travel tips regarding shopping, transportation, eating, and other things. Discover China’s top attractions: the Great Wall, Forbidden City, Yangtze River, Terra Cotta Warriors and Horses, and the cities of Beijing, Shanghai, Guilin, and Xi’an as well as Sichuan Province, Silk Road, and Tibet.
*Douglas Coutts has over 35 years of experience working in international development programs and humanitarian relief operations around the world including stints with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Select Committee on Hunger, the U.S. Congress, and the U.N. World Food Hunger Program. His last posting for the past three years was in Africa as U.N. Resident Coordinator in the Comoros Islands. He is an occasional guest lecturer and speaker at Auburn University.
*Dong Shang is a native of China and has a degree in art. An art designer, she immigrated to the United States, where she has worked as a freelance artist and an art teacher.

The Columbian Exchange is Still Going On: An Examination of the Effects of Columbus’ Discovery of America on the World – A18415
            Wednesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
            Rodrigo Rodriguez – Kabana, Sonny Dawsey, and John Frandsen, Instructors
This course will examine the repercussions of the “discovery” and settlement of the American continent by Europeans on indigenous populations, on Europeans, and indeed the world as a whole. Emphasis will be given to the effects resulting from deliberate, and fortuitous, interchanges of plants and crops, animals, livestock, and of  pathogens and diseases.. The course will begin with considerations of the differences between the Spanish world in 1492 and the New World. This will be followed by descriptions of the effects and significance Eurasian plants and animals in the New World and conversely of New World plants and animals in the Old World. The terrible consequences of the inadvertent interchange of human pathogens between the Europeans and New World indigenous populations will be discussed in depth.
*Rodrigo Rodriguez – Kabana  is Emeritus Distinguished University Professor. Research and teaching  at graduate and undergraduate levels for 50 years at Auburn University combined with Extension activities. Specialized on the effects of cropping systems on sustainability and   the interactions among the soil microbiota and soil health. Recognized nationally and internationally for work within the United Nations Montreal Protocol  that led to the solution of the ”ozone hole” problem.
*Sonny Dawsey is a retired professor of geography, Auburn University. He has taught many classes for OLLI.
*John Frandsen is a retired research biologist, professor, and Army officer who has taught past OLLI courses on infectious diseases, “Great Decisions” (a series sponsored by the Foreign Policy Association), and “Great Issues” (a course similar to this). His interest in public policy was born many years ago in a seminar sponsored by the National Defense University.

Culinary Creations: Cooking with Ursula
Wednesday and Thursday, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
503 Sanders St. Auburn
Ursula Higgins, Instructor
$20 fee per class, non-refundable, payable to Ursula
Enrollment limited to SEVEN students.
Respected culinary expert Ursula Higgins presents a series of cooking classes. Each week features two hands-on classes with the same menu. Students will eat their culinary creations. If you have dietary restrictions, please contact Ursula. If a student registers for a culinary course and then is unable to attend, he or she is responsible for finding an OLLI academic member to fill the opening.
Register for each individual class by using the day’s course number.
October 3 (A18456) and October 4 (A18457)           Another Look at Pig – Refined Pork
October 10 (A18458) and October 11 (A18459)       A Mexican Night Out
October 24 (A18460) and October 25 (A18461)       All Vegetables
October 31 (A18462) and November 1 (A18463)     How About a Halloween Dinner?
November 7 (A18464) and November 8 (A18465)   Time for Fall Soups Again
November 14 (A18466) and November15 (A18467)            Holiday Specials to go with That Bird

Death in Perspective – AA18416
            Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Jenny Filush-Glaze
Text: Filush-Glaze, J. (2017). Grief Talks: Thoughts on Life, Death, and Positive Healing. Auburn, Alabama: Woodson Knowles Publishing Group. ISBN: 978-0-99806032-3.
An innovative and interactive opportunity to explore aspects of death and dying along with how to provide support and healing for our loved ones. A unique look into the "behind the scenes" moments of grief, societal expectations and the answers to questions you have always wondered about and were hesitant to ask- we will explore them all. Grief Talks- Come join in the conversation!
*Jenny Filush-Glaze is a licensed counselor who specializes in death, dying and grief support. A published author and columnist, she encourages conversations on healing and education about the grief journey.

Deep Dive Murder Mysteries – A18417
            Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Sunny Slope
            Julie Strong, Instructor
Enrollment limited to FOURTEEN students.
Texts: Burke, J.L. (2012). Black Cherry Blues: A Dave Robicheaux Novel. Harper. ISBN: 9780062206749.
Burrows, S. (2018). A Siege of Bitterns: Birder Murder Mystery1. One World Publications. ISBN: 9781780748436.
Horowitz, A. (2018). Magpie Murders: A Novel. Harper Perennial. ISBN: 9780062645234.
Hawley, N. (2017). Before the Fall. Grand Central Publishing. ISBN: 9781455561797.
The quality of a mystery novel often depends on the character and demeanor of the detective in charge of solving the crime. In the four mysteries of this term, this is particularly true. Register and order your book early. Read half of Black Cherry Blues before the first class session. Be ready for discussion.
*Julie Strong has a BA in English and comparative literature from Columbia University. She holds a MEd degree in early childhood education and a master’s degree in gifted and talented education. A retired teacher, she facilitates book clubs. 

The Early History of the Church: From the Apostles to Gregory the Great – A18418
            Wednesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
            Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
Ben Jefferies, Instructor
Text: Stevenson, J., and Frend, W. H. (2002). A New Eusebius: Documents Illustrating the History of the Church to AD337. London: SPCK. ISBN: 0-281-04268-3.
How did a movement that began with twelve people in Palestine develop and spread across the Mediterranean and the wider world, becoming the Church as we know it today, with its two billion adherents? How did the early church organize itself? What theology was developed early on and why? How did the Bible come about? What did it mean to be a member of the Church in those first tumultuous centuries? These and similar questions will be examined through a study of primary source documents in this historical survey.
*Reverend Ben Jefferies received an MDiv in 2014, with a heavy emphasis on historical theology. He serves now as an Anglican priest in Opelika. Having grown up in the Baptist Church, it was an introduction to church history that led him to embrace the riches of tradition in his present vocation.

Everyday Engineering: Understanding the Marvels of Daily Life, Part II – A18419
            Tuesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
            Jim Barber, Ned Dendy, and Michael Mason, Instructors
Everyday Engineering is an indispensable guide to the way things work in the world. Conducting this eye-opening, Great Courses DVD tour is Professor Stephen Ressler, an award- winning civil engineer and a nationally honored leader in engineering education. No background in science or engineering is needed to follow this riveting presentation, which offers insight into the complex systems that enhance your life. We will begin Fall 2018 term with Lecture #13.
*Jim is a recently retired construction engineer/contractor with four score and a dozen years of experience that are cheerfully and thankfully in the past. He is working on his advanced degree in geezerhood, and specifically, serial napping and advanced grumpiness.
*Ned Dendy graduated from Auburn University in aerospace engineering. He worked with NASA, with commercial aviation manufacturing, and with the United States Army Missile Defense Systems.
*Michael Mason is a retired army engineer officer and author, artist, and musician. He holds an MS in geophysics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and a BS in geology from Old Dominion University. He is a formally trained meteorological observer. Prior to his retirement, he was a registered professional geologist in Alabama and Tennessee and a Certified Environmental Specialist. 

Extreme Weather –A18420
            Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
            Pebble Hill
            David Newton, Instructor
No place on Earth is safe from severe storms. Tour the world's wildest weather, and learn how to protect yourself from it, with storm-chasing, prize-winning meteorologist, Eric Snodgrass of the University of Illinois.
*David Newton has offered thirteen environmental courses over the years. He is a member of several national environmental organizations, has been a lobbyist for the environment, has traveled to all seven continents, has monitored the water quality of Saugahatchee Creek, has studied climate change for at least ten years, and has worked daily to help protect the Earth - our, and our descendants’, only home.

Guided Palette Painting – A18421
            Thursday, 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
            Clarion Inn & Suites
            John Rhoden, Instructor
Enrollment limited to TWENTY students.
Materials required: palette knives (2), a fan brushand a liner brush, 16x20 canvas, acrylic paint set or titanium white, cadmium yellow (medium hue), ultramarine blue, burnt umber, and sap green acrylic paints.
Using acrylic paint, students will learn to mix basic colors, perspective techniques, and how to hold and use the palette knife. Students will then paint a 16x20 acrylic landscape following step-by-step demonstrations of techniques by the instructor. The finished painting should be one you will proudly display.
*John Rhoden is a retired teacher who has lived in Europe and trained with local artists. He has painted many landscapes, winning numerous awards.

How to Engage in Conversations with the Hearing Impaired – A18422
Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Sunny Slope
            Marsha Kluesing, Instructor
This six week OLLI course will delve into the world of coping with auditory communication through impaired structures (damaged ears). It will offer insight for spouses, children, friends, or caretakers to help improve the vital link of communication that a hearing-impaired person needs to stay connected with the world.  A supportive environment nourishes communication partners to learn and grow in their understanding of the newest research and technology available to enhance the journey of better quality of life for both parties. 
*The instructor is Marsha Kluesing, AuD CCC-A, and Assistant Clinical professor in the Auburn University Speech and Hearing Clinic. 

 How to Listen to and Understand Great Music, Part I – A18423
            Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Jane Brown, Instructor
Professor Robert Greenberg's lectures form a history of music which always presents the material in historical context. Part 1 begins with a brief introduction to the music of ancient Greece, the plainchant of the early middle ages, and music of the Renaissance. It will continue to the early 18th century with the exuberance of musical forms in the Baroque era: the fugue, Baroque opera, the oratorio, the Lutheran Church cantata, passacaglia and the Baroque concerto. Professor Greenberg's passion for music is obvious and his unique sense of humor is what has made him one of the Teaching Company's most popular instructors.
*Jane Brown retired from teaching in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Auburn University. She took piano lessons growing up, played with her high school band, studied early music after taking up the recorder, and currently plays violin with the Auburn University/Community Orchestra.

Increasing Your Happiness – A18424
            Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Sunny Slope
            Joanne Finley, Instructor
Enrollment limited to SIXTEEN students.
Increasing one’s happiness can be done through the power of positive thinking. That is one skill that this workshop will touch on to teach learners how to be happier. Happiness will spread throughout your life, organization, and have a positive effect on everyone. During our Increasing Your Happiness workshop, participants will engage in unique and helpful ways to increase their happiness. It will improve communication skills, increase productivity, and lessen absenteeism.
*Joanne Finley is a consultant and business owner. She has been instructing adult learners since 1980. She has over twenty years of experience working with organizations and community leaders.

Intermediate Line Dancing – A18425
            Monday, 11:15 am – 12:00 pm
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Betsy Keown and Wanda Knight, Instructors
Register for EITHER the beginner class OR the intermediate class.
Enrollment limited to THIRTY students.

Line dancing class for beginners and also an intermediate class, done to a variety of music - everything from Glenn Miller to Willie Nelson, Charlie Daniels, Little Big Town and many more. Not only is it fun, but great exercise for the body and the mind. Wear comfortable shoes, preferably not rubber-soled, and bring a water bottle. *Betsy Keown has been line dancing twice weekly for nine years and teaching for the past four. She loves the exercise and the joy of performing at nursing homes and other venues.
*Wanda Knight has been line dancing a little over eight years and has assisted Betsy Keown for several classes.  

Intermediate Spanish – A18426
            Tuesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Sunny Slope
            Judy Dekich, Instructor
Text: Nissenberg, G. (2018). Spanish Sentence Builder. New York: McGraw-Hill Education.
ISBN 978-1-260-01925-4.
Join us fall term for the continuation of the mystery-drama, The Diary of Ernesto Madero. A slowed-down audiobook with an interactive transcript, it features an easy intermediate level. Our conversation will practice questions and answers as pairs play the game, "Name that Word." Finally, we will improve our writing using the book, Spanish Sentence Builder by Gilda Nissenberg, PhD., published by McGraw Hill, 2nd ed. ISBN 978-1-260-01925-4.
*Judy Dekich majored in Spanish at Emory University. After getting a second degree in pharmacy and practicing as a registered pharmacist, Judy is teaching Spanish to help others learn this beautiful language.

Introduction to Social Media – A18427
            Monday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Jean Yoo, Instructor
Too old for social media? Don’t let anyone tell you that because it’s not possible! Survey after survey reflects more seniors are participating in social media. They are jumping on board Facebook, Twitter, and more as they realize it is fun and provides real benefits. Therefore, this course will take you to explore different social media and how to use them.
*Hyeon Jean Yoo is a PhD student in Adult Education at Auburn University. She has served as an English teacher for eight years in South Korea, and has Bachelor's and master's degree in English Education.

Jambo Kenya! – A18428
            Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Pebble Hill
            Elizabeth I. Essamuah-Quansah and Bill Deutsch, Instructors
This course is a general overview of the country Kenya in East Africa. The class will focus on the country’s history, culture and religion, environment, health, politics, tourism and other related topics.
* Dr. Elizabeth I. Essamuah-Quansah is a Ghanaian-American who currently serves as the Director for AU Outreach Global. She earned her Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration from Auburn University, MBA in Management from Indiana University and BBA in Human Resource from Ghana. She has several years of work experiences in Ghana, other African countries and the U.S. industry, academia and NGOs, including serving as the Coordinator for West Africa Global Ministries. 
*Dr. Bill Deutsch is a Research Fellow, Emeritus in the Auburn University School of Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Environments. He worked through AU’s International Center for Aquaculture and Aquatic Environments for more than 25 years and made about 100 trips to 25 countries on water-related development projects. His career started and ended in East Africa and he made six trips to Kenya from 2012 to 2017 working with the Green Belt Movement in the Central Highlands near Mt. Kenya.

Jews in America – A18429
            Tuesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Michael Friedman, Instructor
The first Jewish families came to American in 1654 and settled in the east. Starting in the mid-19th century, thousands of Jewish families began immigrating to America. Most of the Jews that immigrated were peddlers by trade. Millions of Jews were immigrating to America by the late 19th century. During the 20th and 21st centuries, Jews have become involved in every occupation in America.
*Michael Friedman, who earned his doctorate from Cornell, is Professor Emeritus in Chemistry at Auburn University. He has taught History of Jews several times for OLLI. He has also taught science classes.

Keeping Secrets: Spies and Other Strangers – A18430
            Wednesday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Sunny Slope
            Camille Carr, Instructor
Enrollment limited to SIXTEEN students.
Texts: Coelho, P., & Perry, Z. (2017). The Spy: A Novel of Mata Hari. New York: Vintage Internationa/ Vintage Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC. ISBN: 978-0525432791.
Fagone, J. (2017). The Woman Who Smashed Codes: A True Story of Love, Spies, and the Unlikely Heroine Who Outwitted America’s Enemies. NY, NY: Dey Street Books.
ISBN: 978-0062430519.
Lynds, G. (2016). The Assassins. St MartinS Press. ISBN: 978-0312946098.
Spying began as a gentleman's club, but women have been embedded in the secret services for decades.  This course will take a look at a spy, Mata Hari, guilty or just too liberal for the times, and Elizabeth Smith Friedman, a major code-breaker for the U.S. and England in WWII who didn't get credit for her work.  Can females write good spy novels?  Let's read and find out!
*After serving as a teacher, principal, writing consultant, and reading coach, Camille Carr wants to continue to inspire others to read, read, read. Spy novels are a favorite genre of hers that she sees as sparking that interest.  

Learning Spanish: How to Understand and Speak a New Language, Part IV – A18431
            Wednesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Sunny Slope
Sylvia Cooke, Instructor
Enrollment limited to fifteen students.
Fall 2018 term is part 4 of 4. This Great Courses class features Bill Worden, PhD. He has over twenty years’ experience as an award-winning professor of Spanish. Spoken by over 500 million people worldwide, Spanish is the official language of over twenty countries. This introductory course blends exercises to teach pronunciation, vocabulary building, and basic grammar to empower students to gain confidence with every lesson.
*Sylvia Cooke is retired after 32 years as a Spanish teacher, twenty of which were at Auburn High School. She taught all levels of Spanish from beginning speakers through preparation for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate examinations.

Life in the World’s Oceans – A18432
            Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Don Baker, Instructor
For thousands of centuries, humans lived near the ocean, wandered to its edge, and turned back to the relative safety of the known land. Even when we invented ships and the very bravest among us sailed out, our fears and imaginations took over. What creatures could be living in the unknowable darkness, the bottomless depths? This Great Courses DVD brings you face to face with exciting marine creatures. From the phytoplankton that can only float at the whim of wind and currents to the gray whale that migrates 16,000 kilometers each year, you will be amazed at the variety of life in the seas and what we have only recently learned about its biology, evolution, life cycles, and adaptations.
*Don Baker has a PhD in physical chemistry and a JD. He has over 35 years’ experience as an environmental attorney. During this time he developed a strong interest in the interaction of the academic, industrial, and governmental influences on our lives.

A Little Art Talk / A Little Lunch – A18433
            Wednesday, 11:50 am – 12:40 pm
            Jule Collins Smith Museum Galleries
            Scott Bishop and Docents, Instructors
Enrollment limited to TEN students.
September 26: Margaret Kouidis on Tony Scherman's portrait of Miles Davis
October 3: Jackie Weaver on paintings by Dale Kennington
October 10: Lynn Katz on racial issues in Alabama lithographs of the 1930s and 40s.
October 17: Mary Ley on paintings and prints by Roger Brown
October 24: Margaret Craig-Schmidt on Ben Shahn's art as social commentary
October 31 (Halloween): Bill Squires on art that scares
November 7: Debbie Flick on Mesoamerican textiles
November 14: Charlotte LaRoux on the art of Walter Anderson
*Scott Bishop is curator of education at Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University.

Looking for a TOE – A18434
            Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Charlotte Ward, Instructor
Scientists have been searching for years for a comprehensive "theory of everything" (TOE). This course is a popular level history of that search, right up to last year.
*Charlotte Ward, associate professor emerita, physics, has sought for many years to make science accessible to interested people with little background in science.

On Avoiding Economic Collapse, WW III, and Ecological Catastrophe – A18435
            Monday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
            Pebble Hill
Ted Becker and Richard Penaskovic, Instructors
This course will demonstrate how we have come to the state of affairs that exist today globally—politically, economically and socially.  We will present you with data and analysis to prove that rampant materialism, lust for power, and spiritual/ moral bankruptcy of small ruling classes globally are the root causes of what ails our world.  What they call “capitalism” and “democracy” are facades.  Only the higher road can lead to a fairer share of Earth’s bounty for all; rule by the people; and restoring and redistributing Earth’s bounty fairly.  Half of this upper road is genuine personal “spirituality” (Jesus’ 11th Commandment); the other half is authentic democracy. If you disagree with us, you have something to give us. Warning: This course may  be hazardous to your point of view.
*Ted Becker was the Alma Holladay Professor Emeritus at Auburn University. He was the first Walter Meyer Professor of Law at NYU School of Law and is also professor emeritus at the University of Hawaii. He is the author of 15 books.
*Richard Penaskovic taught religious studies at Auburn University for 30 years. His areas of expertise include interreligious dialogue, the history of Christianity, and ecumenism. He is co-editor of the book, Peacebuilding in a Fractious World: On Hoping Against All Hope.

Open Studio for Advanced Painters – A18436
            Thursday, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
            Clarion Inn & Suites
            No instructor
This time and space is reserved for intermediate to advanced painters who would like to get together and paint. No instructor will be present. Vinyl tablecloths are provided to protect the tables. Please take the provided tablecloths off and place in basket at the end of each open studio session. Participants are responsible for setting-up and cleaning up their own materials. Registration required so that we know how many people to prepare for.

 Photography SIG (Special Interest Group)
            Tuesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Sunny Slope
            An informal gathering of OLLI members interested in photography, no instructor.
A Special Interest Group (SIG) is a group of OLLI members who work together to create a group that meets on a regular basis. Any OLLI at Auburn member, those who paid the $25 membership dues and those who have paid an additional academic fee to take regular courses, are invited to participate in any OLLI at Auburn SIG. No registration is required to attend a SIG. *SIG leader(s) are to be determined by the SIG members. SIG leaders are responsible for notifying the OLLI staff of meeting dates, AV needs, copies, changes in schedules and or classroom, and renewal of SIG for the next academic year. SIG members may re-arrange the furniture in the assigned space, but should place the furniture back as it was prior to the SIG meeting.

Poetry Writing: Memory, Mindfulness, and Metaphor – A18437
            Monday, 10:15 – 11:40 am
Pebble Hill
Ken Autrey, Instructor
Enrollment limited to TWENTY-TWO students.
This class will address strategies for writing and revising poems. As we examine a series of poetic subjects and motifs, we’ll experiment with various types of free and formal verse. The class will discuss sample poems, spend time writing each week, and occasionally look at drafts class members choose to circulate. All writers are welcome; you need not be an accomplished poet to benefit from the pleasures of poetry.
*For many years, Ken Autrey taught poetry workshops at Francis Marion University in South Carolina. He has published three poetry chapbooks, and his work has appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies. He has taught Poetry Writing five times previously for OLLI.

Portrait Photography – A18438
            Tuesday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Rebecca Long. Instructor
Enrollment limited to SIXTEEN students.
Digital SLR with interchangeable lenses, editing software such as Photoshop is a plus.
Hands on course that will include lecture and photography in and around Auburn. Learn how to pose your family and friends for both formal and casual portraits. Discussions will include camera setting basics, lens selection, lighting, posing, post processing and printing.
*Rebecca recently retired from Auburn University and is a professional photographer.

racticing Public Deliberation – A18439
            Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Mark Wilson, instructor
Enrollment limited to TWENTY students.
Are you interested in discussing difficult public issues? The practice of public deliberation is where democracy thrives, and the search for shared direction on divisive issues is the hard work of citizenship. We will talk through tough issues--how to get American politics back on track; immigration; Medicare and Medicaid; public schools; America’s role in the world--facilitated by a neutral moderator and using non-partisan issue guides published by the National Issues Forum.
*Mark Wilson is Director of Civic Learning Initiatives and the Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities in the College of Liberal Arts. He has worked with communities to organize reading-discussion groups as part of this grant, and he has taught two courses in Alabama prisons using these materials.

Reading SIG (Special Interest Group)
Wednesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Sunny Slope
            An informal gathering of OLLI members interested in reading, no instructor.
A Special Interest Group (SIG) is a group of OLLI members who work together to create a group that meets on a regular basis. Any OLLI at Auburn member, those who paid the $25 membership dues and those who have paid an additional academic fee to take regular courses, are invited to participate in any OLLI at Auburn SIG. No registration is required to attend a SIG. *SIG leader(s) are to be determined by the SIG members. SIG leaders are responsible for notifying the OLLI staff of meeting dates, AV needs, copies, changes in schedules and or classroom, and renewal of SIG for the next academic year. SIG members may re-arrange the furniture in the assigned space, but should place the furniture back as it was prior to the SIG meeting.

Real-Life Literacy – A18440
            Tuesday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Pebble Hill
            Tina Tatum, Instructor
Did you know that between 13,000 and 14,000 adults in Lee County are functionally illiterate – unable to read, write, or do math above a third-grade level? Real-life literacy means being able to read road signs, labels on food packaging and medicine bottles, restaurant menus, and other things that we take for granted. Learn more about this urgent need in our community and how you can help by becoming a volunteer tutor for adult literacy learners.
* Tina is the Program Director for Lee County Literacy Coalition, a non-profit organization that utilizes volunteers to tutor adults who need help with reading, writing, and basic math.

 Seated Tai Chi for Arthritis – A18441
            Monday, 12:45 – 1:25 pm
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Kitty Frey and Sandy Wu, Instructors
Enrollment limited to FOURTEEN students.
Seated Tai Chi, adapted from Dr. Paul Lam’s Tai Chi for Arthritis, was designed to enhance flexibility, muscle tone, and fitness. It incorporates the essential principles of Tai Chi with an emphasis on breathing, posture, and space awareness, with the added benefit of stress reduction. Other exercises found to be beneficial for those with arthritis will be included.
*Kitty Frey is an occupational therapist and teacher. An experienced teacher of Taiji and Qigong for many years, she understands that these gentle yet powerful practices offer never-ending learning and show that healing is possible.

Sin, Evil, and Villainy in Dante, Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton – A18442
            Monday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
            Pebble Hill
            Carol Daron, Instructor
This course will examine some of literature’s most notorious characters. We will discuss the characteristics of evil as depicted in selections from western literature of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and late seventeenth century. There will be some optional reading, available online, but there will be no lab and no instructions. Disclaimer: this course is offered to adults of maturity. Neither OLLI at Auburn nor the presenter will accept responsibility for damage or personal injury caused by students inflamed by passion for virtue or against wrong-doing of any kind.
*Carol Daron has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Huntingdon College, a Master of Arts from Florida State University, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree from Auburn University.  She taught in the Auburn English Department for over thirty years, was Director of the Ascent of Man/Human Odyssey science-humanities course sequence, and then served as Assistant Provost for Undergraduate Studies until her retirement.  She has been an OLLI member since 2006.

Southern Food and Culture – A18443
            Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
            Sunny Slope  
Enrollment limited to SIXTEEN students.
This course will explore the role of food in southern life and culture. We will listen to and view oral histories, art, and documentary films about food and even cook and eat some ourselves! Our final project will be a series of collaborative oral histories and a recipe book.
*Dr. Elijah Gaddis is assistant professor of public history at Auburn University.
*Scott Bishop is curator of education at Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University.

 Staying Active: Day Hiking – A18444
Thursday, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
            Sunny Slope
            Harold Bruner, Instructor
There may be a moderate fee to reimburse volunteer drivers for their expenses.
October 25, November 1, 8, 15 (four class sessions)
Enrollment limited to TWELVE students.
This course continues with our goal of experiencing day hiking opportunities within 50 miles or so of Auburn. This is a more advanced class with hikes of 4-7 miles and somewhat challenging terrain. You should be moderately fit and have experience in hiking these distances.  A small day pack and hiking poles are suggested. We will be hiking trails that have not been included with the two previous Day Hiking classes.
*Harold is a retired forester who now hikes for fitness and pleasure. He has hiked extensively in much of the U.S. including California and Alaska, and more recently in Cuba and Canada. Having spent more than 60 years in Indiana and Florida, he now enjoys the biodiverse landscape of Alabama.

Staying Active: A Walk in the Park, Session 1 – A18445
            Thursday, 9:00 - 11:30 am
            Sunny Slope
            Harold Bruner, Instructor
Register for EITHER Session 1 OR Session 2.
September 27, October 4, 11, 18 (four class sessions)
Enrollment limited to FIFTEEN students.
This new course is designed for those who do not wish to pursue the more demanding Day Hiking course. We will be taking leisurely walks of 1.5 - 2 miles in local parks.  Our short hikes will be on non-paved surfaces, sometimes with roots or rocks, so sturdy shoes and a walking stick or a hiking pole(s) are suggested. It is critical to continue to move as we age. Emphasis will be on the benefits of frequent walking of moderate distances in outdoor, non-paved settings.
*Harold is a retired forester who now hikes for fitness and pleasure. He has hiked extensively in much of the U.S. including California and Alaska, and more recently in Cuba and Canada. Having spent more than 60 years in Indiana and Florida, he now enjoys the biodiverse landscape of Alabama.

Staying Active: A Walk in the Park, Session 2 – A18446
            Thursday, 1:30 - 4:00 pm
            Sunny Slope
            Harold Bruner, Instructor
Register for EITHER Session 1 OR Session 2.
September 27, October 4, 11, 18 (four class sessions)
Enrollment limited to FIFTEEN students.
This new course is designed for those who do not wish to pursue the more demanding Day Hiking course. We will be taking leisurely walks of 1.5 - 2 miles in local parks.  Our short hikes will be on non-paved surfaces, sometimes with roots or rocks, so sturdy shoes and a walking stick or a hiking pole(s) are suggested. It is critical to continue to move as we age. Emphasis will be on the benefits of frequent walking of moderate distances in outdoor, non-paved settings.
*Harold is a retired forester who now hikes for fitness and pleasure. He has hiked extensively in much of the U.S. including California and Alaska, and more recently in Cuba and Canada. Having spent more than 60 years in Indiana and Florida, he now enjoys the biodiverse landscape of Alabama.

Stress-Busting for Family Caregivers – A18447
Monday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
Auburn Church of Christ
Leisa Askew and Maria Davis, Instructors
Required text ($55); purchase first day of class.
Caregivers for loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia are invited to enroll. OLLI at Auburn is partnering with the LRCOG Area Agency on Aging to offer a unique educational opportunity for OLLI members who are caregivers for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.
*Leisa Askew graduated with a degree in social work from Auburn University. With over eighteen years in the field of aging, she works at the LRCOG Area Agency on Aging.
*Maria Davis is the Community Ombudsman at the Area Agency on Aging.  She earned a B.S. in human environmental services from The University of Alabama and an MBA from Troy State University. 

Stretch and Balance – A18448
            Monday, 2:30 – 3:30 pm
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Tammy Hollis
Stretch and Balance will move through a series of seated and standing yoga poses using a chair for support. These postures are designed to increase flexibility, balance, and range of motion. This class is suitable for nearly every fitness level.
*Tammy Hollis is certified by the American Council on Exercise Group Fitness. She also has certifications for YogaFit and Silver Sneakers. Currently, Tammy serves as an instructor for Yin Yoga for the City of Auburn for its 50+ program, for Yin Yoga for Opelika Sportsplex, for Silver Sneakers Circuit and Classic Classes, and for Silver Sneakers and Gentle Yoga for Opelika Sportsplex.

Taiji Qigong: Moving Meditation – A18449
            Monday, 1:30 – 2:10 pm
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Kitty Frey and Sandy Wu, Instructors
Enrollment limited to TWENTY students.
Taiji Qigong was designed as a deeply relaxing body-mind experience. Composed of several sets, each with unique purposes that are easy to learn and with regular practice can replenish energy, improve health, and help prevent illness. Several variations of Taiji walking will also be introduced. Participants must be able to be up and moving for 45 minutes.
*Kitty Frey is an occupational therapist and teacher. An experienced teacher of Taiji and Qigong for many years, she understands that these gentle yet powerful practices offer never-ending learning and show that healing is possible.

 Those Mysterious Mushrooms  - A18450
            Tuesday, 2:30 – 3:55 pm
            Pebble Hill
            Robert Stack, Instructor
Mushrooms often seem to spring up overnight and in unexpected places. In rainy seasons they appear everywhere: in lawns and gardens, meadows and roadsides, and especially in the woods. Where do they come from? Many folks’ familiarity with mushrooms begins and ends with grocery store packages, on pizza, or as a nuisance in the lawn. This course will introduce the diversity of mushrooms and the fungi that make them and demonstrate, at an introductory level, how to recognize some common wild mushrooms. Growing exotic mushrooms and cooking mushrooms will also be considered. Each week students will have an opportunity to share their “finds” with the class.
*Bob Stack taught Mycology subjects for thirty years at North Dakota State Univ. before retiring to Alabama in 2006. He has hunted, photographed, and eaten wild mushrooms ever since his student days in upstate New York. He will illustrate his talks with his many original photographs.

Walk This Way: Couch to Walking 5K – A18451
            Thursday, 8:30 – 9:30 am
            Meet at Toomer’s Corner by the oaks.
            Bob Banks, Instructor
Join us for this eight-week program designed to assist you in developing a walking exercise program. Students will meet at Toomer’s Corner by the oaks each Thursday to learn about the benefits of walking. This course is open to novice and veteran walkers.
*Bob Banks is an avid runner. A retired insurance professional, Bob concluded his career with Alfa Insurance.

War in the Pacific: A Military History – A18452
            Tuesday, 12:45 – 2:10 pm
            Jule Collins Smith Museum Auditorium
            Frank Broz, Instructor
This course will examine the War in the Pacific from a multi-national perspective. We will not just view it as the U.S. vs. Japan but include the contributions of Australia, England, China and the Asian people. The course will discuss doctrine, tactics, weapons, climate and their effect on the outcome. We will also consider how the war changed Asia and brought an end to Western imperialism.
*Frank Broz has a lifelong interest in military history with particular emphasis on the War in the Pacific. His career in sales training with major corporations has honed his presentation skills. Frank has a BA in history from Loyola University of Chicago.

What Has Happened to Sports and Why, Part III – A18453
            Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Jim Barber, Instructor
There are many examples of questionable practices in different sports that we will watch (via videos), review (printed material on the internet), research (from various forms of media), discuss, and hopefully partially resolve these questions. This is an investigatory course! Bring your passion, your pride, favorite sports bias, anxiety medication, and join the fun or fight.
*Jim is a recently retired construction engineer/contractor with four score and a dozen years of experience that are cheerfully and thankfully in the past. He is working on his advanced degree in geezerhood, and specifically, serial napping and advanced grumpiness.

Writing Our Lives – A18454
            Monday, 8:30 – 9:55 am
            Pebble Hill
            Terry Ley and Cathy Buckhalt, Instructors
Enrollment limited to FIFTY students.
Text: TBD
“Our Lives are like a patchwork quilt, and it is only in the evening of life that we can see the pattern of what we have woven.” (Richard L. Morgan, Saving Our Stories: A Legacy We Leave) We all have life stories to tell! Here is an opportunity to reclaim your memories, write about them, and share them with a receptive audience of peers. We will write each Monday morning, responding to stimulus prompts provided by the instructor. Recommended homework: finishing and revising what you have begun in class and reading self-selected memoirs, biographies, and autobiographies.
*Terry Ley taught high school English in Iowa before coming to Auburn University, where he was a professor of English education. He has taught Writing Our Lives each OLLI term for fourteen years.
*Cathy Buckhalt is a retired teacher from Opelika Middle School and Southern Union State Community College. She also was associate director of the Sun Belt Writing Project for many years.

Yoga for the Rest of Us – A18455
            Monday, 9:00 – 9:55 am
            Auburn Church of Christ
            Tammy Hollis, Instructor
Enrollment limited to TWENTY-FIVE students.
This course is for anyone who has practiced yoga. All levels are welcome. The focus is on stretching, movement, and balance, all interwoven with breathing techniques. Bring your mat and towel to support your knees or back, and wear comfortable clothing as we continue our yoga journey together.
Tammy earned a BS from Auburn University in Family and Child Services and a Certificate in Aging Studies. She retired from Auburn University in 2016 after 28 years of service as Coordinator for Healthy Tigers Wellness Program (employee wellness program).
*Tammy Hollis is certified by the American Council on Exercise Group Fitness. She also has certifications for YogaFit and Silver Sneakers. Currently, Tammy serves as an instructor for Yin Yoga for the City of Auburn for its 50+ program, for Yin Yoga for Opelika Sportsplex, for Silver Sneakers Circuit and Classic Classes, and for Silver Sneakers and Gentle Yoga for Opelika Sportsplex.

 

Last Updated: July 30, 2018